Dozens of residents of California nursing home hit with COVID-19 and 2 have died

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Coronavirus highlights outbreak risk at nursing homes

Los Angeles — A Southern California nursing home has been hit hard by the coronavirus, with more than 50 residents infected. It's a troubling development amid cautious optimism that cases in the state may peak more slowly than expected.

Cedar Mountain Post Acute Rehabilitation in Yucaipa has been told to assume all its patients have COVID-19, San Bernardino County Department of Public Health Director Trudy Raymundo said. As of Tuesday, 51 residents and six staff members had tested positive. Two patients have died, including an 82-year-old woman who had existing health problems.

The nursing home east of Los Angeles isn't accepting new residents and the facility has been closed to visitors under Gov. Gavin Newsom's two-week-old stay-at-home order, Raymundo said.

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Residents were said to have been quarantined in their rooms and staff was staying in RVs outside the facility, the daughter of one of the residents told CBS Los Angeles. San Bernardino health officials said the county is working to test all employees and residents of both facilities, the station added.

The announcement came as Newsom said extraordinary efforts to keep people home have bought the time needed to prepare for an expected peak surge of coronavirus cases in coming weeks.

Newsom said the slower-than-forecast increase in cases means the peak is now likely to occur in May, though he was reluctant to say whether that means the impact on the state won't be nearly as dire as initially feared.

Two weeks ago, Newsom said more than half the state's 40 million people could be infected under a worst-case scenario.

"To be truthful and candid, the current modeling is on the lower end of our projection as I talk to you today," Newsom said Tuesday. "Very easily tomorrow I could say something differently, and that's why one just has to be very cautious about this."

Under Newsom's direction, the state has been scrambling to add 50,000 hospital beds to its current 75,000 to ensure enough space for all potential patients during a peak.

As of early Wednesday, there were more than 8,500 cases and at least 182 deaths reported in California, according to data kept by Johns Hopkins University. Michigan, which has 30 million fewer residents, had about 7,600 cases and at least 259 deaths.

Health officials have warned that as testing ramps up, the number of cases will grow, in some instances very quickly.

Many have credited the state's early action in issuing stay-at-home orders – first in the San Francisco Bay Area two weeks ago and then a few days later in Los Angeles and the rest of the state – with successfully slowing the rise of cases.

Many retail businesses and social venues such as theme parks are closed, restaurants are only offering take out or delivery, and most school campuses have been closed for weeks.

On Tuesday, San Francisco and six surrounding counties extended shelter-in-place orders until May 3 and added new restrictions, including closing playgrounds, dog parks, public picnic areas, golf courses, tennis and basketball courts, pools, and rock-climbing walls.

Also on Tuesday, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond warned that he expects schools to remain closed into summer and suggested that districts plan to provide other forms of learning for the rest of the academic year.

Eight residents of a New Jersey nursing home have died and all 94 residents of another New Jersey home were moved to another facility after two dozen tested positive for the coronavirus. In Washington state, some 35 residents of a single home near Seattle have died.

While social distancing precautions seem to be generally obeyed by California's population, there are concerns that the virus will rampage through enclosed, crowded facilities such as nursing homes and prisons, and among the state's estimated 150,000 homeless people, who are hard to test or quarantine.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said that nursing home populations are at the highest risk of being affected by COVID-19 given the "congregate nature" of the facilities and the fact that many residents have chronic medical conditions.

U.S. Rep. Paul Cook, who represents the area that includes Yucaipa, said he and others had told themselves: "'God almighty, I hope that it never breaks out in a convalescent home,' and this is what has happened."

"It could be serious today and even worse tomorrow if we don't do our jobs," he said. "We've got to make sure that this does not spread."

Dr. Deborah Birx, coordinator of the White House coronavirus task force, said actions by California and Washington state to close schools, encourage people to work from home and only go out for essential needs had given her hope the virus could be controlled through social distancing measures.

Birx spoke Tuesday as grim new projections of 100,000 to 240,000 deaths nationwide were announced and President Trump called on Americans to heed his safety guidelines, which are weaker than those in place in California and several other states.

First published on April 1, 2020 / 7:46 AM

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